MiniMe–opinionated JavaScript and CSS bundling

by dotnetnerd 6. July 2011 20:03

Why MiniMe?

For a while I have been using SquishIt to minify, bundle and version JavaScript and CSS files – and to a large extent it did a good job. However on a number of occations I ran into a group of scenarios where it just didn’t quite do enough for what I wanted. So when I was starting a new project and ran into the same issues again, I decided to take a look at making my own.

The basic idea behind MiniMe is that it should make it easy to bundle JavaScript and CSS files across masterpages, usercontrols etc. with the option to control how they are sorted, and end up with one file that is minified and versioned. It should also be easy to introduce into an existing project, with a minimal amount of refactoring, and lastly it should be easy to adhere to best practices and inject the script tag at the very bottom of the html page.

These are the requirements that I run into again and again, so I wanted a tool that did exactly that.

Getting started

To make it as easy as possible I made a nuget package, so all you need to get off the ground is to search for MiniMe in the package manager and hit install.

Building a complete file

Now you have access to the classes MiniJavaScriptBuilder and MiniStyleSheetBuilder, that can be used to build either a JavaScript or CSS file. The approach is similar, so from how on I will just show the JavaScript case. Using either one you can build a collection of files by calling Add or AddToRequest, which takes a path to the file you wish to add. The difference is that Add is local to the instance of the builder, where the ToRequest version is stored for the request across any number of builders. Both methods return the builder instance, so calls to Add/AddToRequest can be chained.

@{ new MiniMe.MiniJavaScriptBuilder()
    .AddToRequest(Url.Content("/scripts/myFirstScriptFile.js"))
    .AddToRequest(Url.Content("/scripts/mySecondScriptFile.js"), 1)         
    }

When using AddToRequest you can optionally pass an index as a second parameter. Files with a lower index are included before those with a higher index – allowing files that are added from usercontrols to run after those added in the masterpage.

Manually rendering a combined file

When all your files have been added you can call either Render or RenderForRequest, which will behave differently depending on if you have turned debug on in web.config or not. If you are in debugmode there is simply rendered a reference to each file, allowing you to debug like you are used to. If you are NOT in debugmode the files that were added will be combined and saved to the path you pass to the method. Writing a # as part of the path will enable versioning, so the # is replaced by a hashvalue of the filecontent. Versioning will make sure the filename changes when any of the files are changed, so caching does not prevent your users from getting any changes that you have made.

@{ MvcHtmlString.Create(new MiniMe.MiniJavaScriptBuilder()
.AddToRequest(Url.Content("/scripts/myFirstScriptFile.js"))
.AddToRequest(Url.Content("/scripts/mySecondScriptFile.js"), 1)
.RenderForRequest(Url.Content("~/Scripts/Site_#.min.js")))
}

Automatically injecting a combined file

Working with complex layouts can be a pain, because you have to take into account the order the usercontrols are rendered, and you will have duplication of code to render the files. To solve this MiniMe comes with an HttpHandler that will handle the rendering for you. This means that files that are added to the request, will be bundled, the combined JavaScript is referenced from the very bottom of the page and the Stylesheet is referenced from the header. All you have to do is add the HttpModule.

<system.webServer>
    <modules>
        <add name="MiniHttpModule" type="MiniMe.MiniHttpModule, MiniMe"/>

By default the HttpModule renderes the files to “/Scripts/Site_#.min.js” and “/Content/Site_#.css” – this can be overwritten using appSettings

<appSettings>
    <add key="MiniJsRelativePath" value="/Scripts/OtherSite_#.min.js"/>
    <add key="MiniCssRelativePath" value="/Content/OtherSite_#.min.css"/>

Create .min.js versions of all JavaScript files

In some cases you might want to have MiniMe generate .min.js versions for any files that have not yet been minified. This will also give you a slight performance boost, because MiniMe will not have to do the minification on the fly when files are combined. It is important to note that MiniMe will only make minified versions when no minified version already exist. Personally my preference is to do it when not running in debugmode, because then I won’t have to delete the minified versions when I make chances, in order for MiniMe to generate new ones.

if (!HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled) new MiniGenerator().EnsureMiniVersions("/Scripts");

Go to the source to gain more insight or contribute

MiniMe is hosted on bitbucket, so if you wish to see how it works, or if you want to contribute please don’t hesitate. The first version was focused around the features I felt were missing, but there are undoubtedly other scenarios that can provide value.

Mama said knock you out!

by dotnetnerd 20. May 2011 13:35

In my last post I looked at how WCF Web API plays well with JQuery Templates. A former colleague of mine questioned if it could be used in all scenarios. This is a rather broad question, but I do think it can be used for most of your templating needs.  So in this post I will give an example of what can be done just with templates – and then I will take a look at KnockoutJS to make my templating scenario even sweeter.

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Web API playing well with JQuery Templates

by DotNetNerd 1. May 2011 21:38

Since my last blogpost about Web API Glenn Block appeared on Hanselminutes so it seems to be hot stuff at the moment. Having already written part of this blogpost, as it was actually part of the last post before I decided to break it in half, it seems a good time to finish it and get it out there. So building on my last post I will also take a look at how Web API plays along with JQuery and the new JQuery templates.

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by dotnetnerd 25. April 2011 14:14

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RESTful services seem to be all the rage these days, which made me look at some of the choices we have as developers for doing REST. This was really my first look at Web API, so with it being one of the more exciting news at MIX11, it was only natural to take a deeper look.

20667-650x203crop0

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Yearning for some learning?

by DotNetNerd 1. April 2011 19:57

A piece of advise that is often given to developers who want to keep improving, is to learn a new programming language every year. I mostly think it holds true if you try to learn a new paradigme – because just learning new syntax won’t really get you anywhere.

Koans

One way of learning a new language is of course to buy a book or two, and start reading and doing some samples and small applications. Another way of going about it is to try some of the koans, interactive interpreters and introductory guides that can be found online.

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Who am I?

My name is Christian Holm Diget, and I work as an independent consultant, in Denmark, where I write code, give advice on architecture and help with training. On the side I get to do a bit of speaking and help with miscellaneous community events.

Some of my primary focus areas are code quality, programming languages and using new technologies to provide value.

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